Shoot Vintage Pentax 110 Lenses on Micro Four Thirds

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Micro Four Thirds has always been a great platform for adapting lenses. We discover the joy of using vitage Pentax Auto 110 lenses on a Micro Four Thirds camera.

Between 1978 and 1985 Pentax sold the Pentax Auto 110, a miniature SLR system built around Kodak’s small-format 110 film cartridges. The 110 system is no longer with us, but its lenses are a perfect match for Micro Four Thirds.

Music provided by BeatSuite.com
http://www.beatsuite.com

Pentax 110 lenses provided by The Camera Store
http://www.thecamerastore.com

Check out Caleb Pike’s episode about 110 lenses for video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pRnvqqOOg1w
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Comments

Michael Gerrard says:

It would be great if Pentax joined M43! They could make a camera with character, they'd immediately have a huge library of lenses available for it plus they'd have their own. Those already invested in M43 would be tempted to try Pentax. Come on, make it happen!

Will Price says:

Why is anyone giving this thumbs down? 🤔

Angel Bravo says:

I think adapting vintage medium format glass onto the modern Fuji medium format cameras would be amazing

Sun and D-970 says:

Try Minolta MD Mk III 50mm f/1.2 on digital.

Joseph Olar says:

If the Lens fit best way to get creative and have fun at the same time .
Cheers

Barry Abdul says:

I have these lenses, and Lumix GM5. They form a very good, fun combos! Sharpness are acceptable, contrast are adequate. Can't stop smiling when using them!

Randall Stewart says:

There are so many errors in this video that it's just laughable. These Pentax 110 lenses are super sharp, provided you use them on the cameras intended. Any lens is not going to be sharp at its worst opening which is wide open, as here. Why no aperture in the lens? Because the 110 series of cameras were fully automatic exposure with no user control. The leaf shutter also performed the function of the aperture. Sharp?? When Pentax was advertising this camera system, they bought two adjoining ad pagers. One page for text and the opposite page for a full 11×14 inch color enlargement – tack sharp. (The "cheat" was that they shot on Kodak Ektra 25, perhaps the sharpest, finest grain color film ever made.) Could you add an aperture behind the lens? You would have to gut the shutter out of a 110 body and somehow ??? rig it to open and close manually. Conclusion: the idea of adapting these lenses to digital cameras is a crock, as is this video.

Bryan Escalante says:

So the pentax 110 is the original pentax Q

Tim Potts says:

I thought those images looked great? Certainly had their own individual ‘look’ to them. Not all of the iconic images of the past were razor sharp, but great photos non the less. Just my thoughts 👍🏻

King Yodklai says:

M39 adapted lenses would be interesting since they were designed for a short flange distance resulting in a small adapter. Plus they cover full frame and the adapter comes very cheap.

Jeff Smudde says:

I'd love to see Pentax 67 lenses on a Pentax 35mm body! I've seen the adapters around and I've always wanted to try it out.

Matt Hitchins says:

It would be a great market for Pentax to break into as competition is so high in the full frame market. I'd buy one in a heart beat!

Joseph Bonifacio says:

I would really like to see how this adaptor works out! Please make a video on this m43 to z-mount adaptor.
https://www.amazon.com/Compatible-Micro-Thirds-Nikon-Camera/dp/B07WBYS2F2

Len k says:

Adapt crazy long focal length lenses to a Pentax q

Joseph Reidhead says:

Very fun video. I wish you would do more videos like this.

Len k says:

I would love them to do that. They need to make new q cameras and lenses

Len k says:

You missed their 70mm

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